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Search Results 0 to 20 of about 21 (some duplicates have been removed)
trying to change b this country. he was the naacp's first field secretary in mississippi. he had fought for his country in world war ii. before coming home to fight for justice here. his assassination by a white supremacist in june of 1963 helped to inspire the march on washington. joining me now is myrlie evers williams, the widow of medgar evers and a legendary civil rights leader in her own right. and historian taylor branch author of the trilogy of books on dr. king and the civil rights movement. thank you both for being on tonight. >> it's a pleasure. >> thank you. >> let me start with you ms. evers williams. your husband was killed in june of '63, and it was part of what really ignited the movement that had already started around having this march. you were the speaker at that march and didn't make it. and one of the things we're most proud of is tomorrow you're going to make that speech at lincoln memorial for the march on washington. >> well, thank you. >> 50 years later. >> thank you ever so much. >> tell us what was running through your mind as you fought in mississippi and th
nonviolent coordinating committee in greenwood, mississippi. she was on the staff of the march of washington. also, kweisi mfume. and the national editor for "vanity fair," the author of the upcoming book, "an idea whose time has come, two presidents, two parties and the battle for the civil rights act." thank you for joining me. congresswoman, i want to start with you. you have probably some very distinct memories. i was talking about the fact that for people who experienced it, it probably feels like yesterday. for people born after 1963, it feels like ancient history. take us to washington 1963 on that august day. >> well, 1963 was the high point of the civil rights movement in many ways. haven't worked on the staff of the march, being young and foolish, i expected a whole lot of people to come. but nobody really knew how many would come. what was really challenging was the unprecedented nature of the march. there had never been a mass march in washington, much less for civil rights. so if people asked me about what was the -- what do you remember most, frankly, it was not necessarily the
on the a dark rainy morning as he found himself biking to his miserable job in mississippi he felt real despair. from recognized he was 47 years old and never had a car and afford for 20 years in prison. sometimes he says it's little things like that that can drag him down into sorrow. he chose to do something that both keep those wasted years fresh in his memory. he helps to educate others in the hopes that his story will spur reform. he's not an educated man. his formal schooling stopped in 6th grade. the katrina criminal justice reform effort. that's the holistic reentry program for offenders. he told anybody with time to spare and inclination to listen. putting a face on an abstract idea, injustice. on this particular afternoon in may 2012, he tells this story to me for a fourth time. he is deeply preoccupied with a judge who denied his case for years. who also heard his murder case in 1976. the month he was released the judge died. greg goes to his house to get his tattered obituary he's read many times. the obituary says nice things. the judge may have been a goodman, greg muses, he might
the speech but the flow of blood -- couldn't make the march. because she was in jail in mississippi when the sheriff told the -- they beat her unconscious. she couldn't make the march. james couldn't make the march. he was in jail. the day of the march the people were in jail. and so i'm anxious for us to make a appropriation legislation event not just reflection and motivation. i'm already motivated. we are -- that's why you came here now. let me say reverend jackson. here is what reverend jacksons wants you to do. we need some money. we are having a reception next door. we knew we put together. we didn't get no sponsor. we need some support. i hope in all of our givings let us sustain ourselves. something we should ask people -- [inaudible] sometimes we can't fight if the people got the fight on the right -- [inaudible] am i right about that? >> yes. >> you wouldn't like to give $100 would you stand. we need the money real bad. >> you would give at least $100. stand. this is not personal. pay your way. >> pay your way. >> credit card, food stamps. stand up. stand up. keep standing. now
? that's right. high school geography for $800. joe. what is the mississippi river? yes. high school geography for $1,200. [ beep ] right there in the heart of new york -- manhattan. back to you, joe. pop culture for $400. barrett. what is "transformers"? no. emily. what is "avatar"? "avatar." correct. new in merriam-webster for $400. emily. what is an aha! moment? that's right. merriam-webster for $800. joe. what is a bucket list? correct. new in merriam-webster for $1,200. barrett. what is a song? song. correct. new in merriam-webster for $1,600, please. joe. what is an element? yes. new in merriam-webster for $2,000. emily. what is gassed? gassed. yes. pop culture for $800. barrett. what is a mustache? no. joe. what is a beard? a beard. very black beards. yes. joe, back to you. pop culture for $1,200. watch out for night monsters as you build your own 3-d online world using this game. emily. what is "minecraft"? correct. pop culture for $1,600. [ beep ] and that comic is steve harvey. back to you, emily. pop culture for $2,000. listen. ♪ everybody talks, everybody talks ♪ ♪
every hill of mississippi and from every mountainside. let freedom ring, and when it happens, when we allow freedom to ring, when we let it ring from every village and from every state and every city we will be able to speed up the day that all of us black men and white men choose power and we will be able to join hands and sing in the old spirit of free at last, free at last. thank god almighty we are free at last. [applause] >> on a sunday morning in september of 1963, for young black girls attended sunday school at the 16th st. storch church. the bible lesson was a love that for dallas. the girl moved to the basement when suddenly an always went through the church like a cannon. the bomb planted near the basement went through the house of worship. they toppled a gruesome discovery. sandia, age 14, carroll robertson, age 14. addy mae colins and denise age 11 all were found dead, their bodies buried atop one another. >> it's great to be visible all through dallas. >> it will only be a matter of minutes before he arrives at the turnpike. >> they got in the newsroom and as perhaps you
? guest: it is certainly a valid point. host: let's try charles from mississippi. republican line. hi, there. caller: my question to the lady would be that i noticed during this family vacation with the president's family was gone to martha's vineyard, they left bo the dog at home, and sent a marine helicopter to bring it back at a cost of over $300,000. i would like to know why that is not talked about more. host: more about the president there. guest: i do not know where the facts are coming from, but i find that intriguing, and if that is true, that is certainly something reuters would want to know about and write about. i have a long record in journalism looking into the -- exactly that kind of thing. i will take that note home with me. host: a couple of callers are mentioning the white house, and twitter, the same thing. we have been talking about rules congress wrote for itself for travel. you have a sense of how the white house works in this area -- how he decides where they are going? is anyone oversee those decisions because we are hearing it from callers? guest: i do not kno
orleans, pascagula and gulf port, mississippi. we thought we had dodged the bullet and then the levies broke and who would have predicted that there was a sea of humanity in the super dome that basically was in extreme miss? who would have predicted in this day and age we would lose many, many people based on the fact they couldn't be medevacked, that the hospitals themselves had been flooded and the hospital staff was having to carry critically ill patients up to the top floors to avoid the water that was filling in the rooms. who would have predicted that? and were we set up to handle that? and who would have predicted in the early goings there would be civic disorder and civic disobedience and lack of command and control and then the military came there and provided that stability for a while until the civic authorities took over and eventually got things moving in a fairly organized continuum. we learned a tremendous amount of lessons from that, lessons that i hope no other city will ever have to repeat again. but the bottom line is it is so critical at this point to talk about
will not be satisfied as long as the negro in mississippi cannot vote, and the negro in new york believes he has nothing for which to vote. [applause] >> there was no way to know then that it would have the impact that it has had. there was no way we knew he would live long enough to see a black president. >> i cried because it never occurred to me that i would live along enough to see a black man as president of the united states. >> for a black man in this society there was always a need to be cautious about the way you presented yourself in public because you could end up like trayvon. i think dr. king let us understand that you still have to take the risk. i love being a black man in america because it means that there is still hope that things can be changed without mowing down thousands of citizen the way it's happening in other parts of the world. >> it still hurts when other people don't think of you as an american. you're a black american, which means you're an american. if the rest of the country never sees us as americans we'll be struggling with the third march, the tenth march, the 15th mar
to a protest in mississippi, i was 14 years old. and it was scary as hell. my father was arrested over 50 times and i got arrested with him once, myself. my mother would never bail him out. after the third time the sheriffs called, this time they called and said well, your son is with them. they bailed us both out. and i said next year, pop, how about we go to the beach? >> all right, so this is for me, from deborah k., i just wanted to know where did she go to college and what prompted her to be a conservative? >> i went to the university of arizona, bear down, go wildcats, my parents were conservatives, i'm a daughter of the american revolution. i wrote a letter to bill clinton when i was 6 years old, about how our taxes are too high. all right, this is for all of us. this is from tim c. you have just been nominated as ambassador of the united states, congratulations, which country, and why? >> england, because it is the only place i could speak the language. >> brazil, i love their energy policy. >> i love their women. >> of course. >> awesome. >> if i chose a country i wanted to be from, ot
the context here and the whole climate was set. jim was in jail than mississippi. the sheriff's told the black inmates either beat her or we will be to you. so they beat her unconscious. so there were 200 demonstrations of the country that day and people going to jail. the public accommodations bill, the dream was the right to vote. the dream of 66 was in chicago for housing. the treen at 67 was the poor people's campaign to end the war mike in vietnam. dr. king made the case from 32% down to 12 on the lyndon johnson war on poverty. by the way, our hearts were trained with pain johnson had no background on civil rights. only the civil rights legislator in the history of the country and passed with lyndon johnson and 64 kuhl of the voting rights act of 65, daycare, child-care, speeding programs, appellations, the regional council, all of that is lbj. the record matches are lyndon baines johnson. the speech is always around. from the last staff meeting it went something like this. i had a migraine headache for nine days and maybe my time is up. maybe i've done as much as i could do. maybe i shou
that will swim up, they have been known to swim up to mississippi river. most say it is the mouth of the bay. one thing you don't need to be concerned is getting attacked by a shark in chesapeake bay. there are parts of the world, chesapeake bay, they are uncommon there >> reporter: you don't need to worry about going in the bay? >> with the frequency, number of bull sharks going on, very infrequent, not going to be a problem. >> reporter: were you surprised? >> it happened in 2001. couple of fisherman, caught them, turned up at the mouth of the potomac. typically a couple every year. this is something going on. chesapeake bay is a highway of fish coming in from the ocean. they are there for food just like these sharks are coming for food. they are full of stipe bass. >> reporter: they are not hunting people? >> they are looking for fish. >> reporter: if you see one, what should you do? >> if you are at the beach and see a large shark, it would be in your best interest to go to the pool. >> reporter: i am with you. [laughter]. >> we have 16 species of sharks in the lower bay. bay is important for
, -- another one, holding a town hall this evening in mississippi -- he posts a picture on instagram of the folks coming into that town hall in mississippi. also this evening, john boehner is holding a conference call with republicans. politico reports on that. the headline -- they write the republican leadership hold a conference this evening. topics expected to be discussed include immigration reform legislation, government funding and the debt ceiling, and those issues are expected to be top priorities in the fall. they said conference calls of this nature are typical during long recesses. the house has been out of session for three weeks and does not return to washington until september 9. back to calls. caller: hi. my son is a student going to college. he is going to a private college. my husband and i are both middle-class americans. i am a teacher. the costs are daunting. by the time he is done with school completely, $250,000 in loans. he wants to be an orthopedic surgeon. >> right. caller: of course you when you talk to move ahead and break those barriers. we get a bill in t
many different ways can you make cod? >> ainsley: then mississippi, then alabama. >> tucker: have you been to high land foreign grill outside birmingham? >> brian: is this a push back on the study? >> tucker: this is a push back. >> ainsley: how about drunkest state? what do you think it is? louisiana, florida, california? where is nevada on there. >> tucker: what about maine? come on. >> ainsley: the rudest state. come on! who did they ask? new york? >> tucker: yeah. that's the foulest area. >> ainsley: shocker. new york, new jersey, then california. >> brian: if you get a chance to see people in california, they do seem rude. nicest state, georgia, minnesota or hawaii? all nice people and nice looking states. >> tucker: they're all nice. the cost of insurance is rising with obamacare a lot. what if there was a way around that? meet the doctor who saved one patient $17,000 by not using his insurance. >> ainsley: then the next batman is revealed. the name that no one expected. that's coming up. too soft. too tasty. [ both laugh ] [ male announcer ] introducing progresso's new creamy a
into a settlement agreement with the school district in meridian, mississippi, in which we found egregious examples of disproportionate suspension, expulsion, and school-based arrests. a black male high school student was told by one of his teachers that when he got older, he would either be in hell or in jail. andas suspended subsequently arrested for wearing the wrong socks to school. there was another black male high school student. an administrator asked him to tuck your shirt into his pants. he refused. the principal grabbed him in a headlock and he school security officer sprayed the student with mace. he was arrested and sent to juvenile detention. aree kinds of examples horrible. they have lifelong -- often lifelong consequences for students who are treated in this way. often times, they are unlawful. that is where the justice department can come in. we enforce the laws that bar discrimination by schools based on race, national origin, sex, and religion. that is what we did. we went into meridian, we investigated, we found that black students received harsher disciplinary consequences. susp
in mississippi weighing 7 pounds and 10 ounces. his parents nathan and mary beth are enjoying every minute because he's growing so fast. >> he looks like he says, what happened? >> big congratulations. if you want a chance for your baby to appear in our today's johnson's baby of the week go to klgandhoda for details. >>> it's try day friday. we have our white gloves on. there's some beautiful dancers over here. jubilee dancers. >> should we go join them? >> yes. they are from bally's in las vegas. one of them is catherine. the other is kathy. nice to meet you guys. a lot of kathys here today. first of all, you are here in new york doing auditions for other kathys to go to vegas and be a jubilee dancer, right? >> yes. >> what's so difficult to do? >> it's pretty hard. there's lots of kicks. lots of bevels. >> why don't you show us a couple of moves. >> the hardest part is getting the body to look like yours. >> it's not going to fit hoda's head. >> i believe. >> ow, that's got to hurt her. >> it's fine. it's good. no, it's good. it's good. okay. give us some moves. >> sorry. >> sorry. >> we
a valid point. host: let's try charles from mississippi. republican line. hi, there. caller: my question to the lady would be that i noticed during this family vacation with the president's family was gone to martha's vineyard, they left bo the dog at home, and sent a marine helicopter to bring it back at a cost of over $300,000. i would like to know why that is not talked about more. host: more about the president there. guest: i do not know where the facts are coming from, but i find that intriguing, and if that is true, that is certainly something reuters would want to know about and write about. i have a long record in journalism looking into the -- exactly that kind of thing. i will take that note home with me. host: a couple of callers are mentioning the white house, and twitter, the same thing. we have been talking about rules congress wrote for itself for travel. you have a sense of how the white house works in this area. how he decides where they are going? is anyone oversee those decisions because we are hearing it from callers? guest: i do not know the full answers. it would m
Search Results 0 to 20 of about 21 (some duplicates have been removed)